Stamped: Racism, Antiracism and You, by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi | the first nonfiction book I’ve reviewed on my blog, and it has not let me down

Hello! I finished reading this book earlier today, and immediately got started with a review. I’ve seen this book being talked about in countless places, and I’ve heard incredible things about it. Also, I thought that it might be good to point out that, uh, I’ve been blogging her for 10 months (wow that’s a long time) and I have never ever reviewed a nonfiction book that wasn’t a biography. (Brown Girl Dreaming got that) Anyways, here is my review of Stamped: Racism, Antiracism and You, by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi.

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism and You

Author: Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

Release Date: March 10th 2020 

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Genre: Non fiction, middle grade

Series? Standalone

Synopsis:

A timely, crucial, and empowering exploration of racism–and antiracism–in America

This is NOT a history book.
This is a book about the here and now.
A book to help us better understand why we are where we are.
A book about race.

The construct of race has always been used to gain and keep power, to create dynamics that separate and silence. This remarkable reimagining of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi’s National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning reveals the history of racist ideas in America, and inspires hope for an antiracist future. It takes you on a race journey from then to now, shows you why we feel how we feel, and why the poison of racism lingers. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited.

Through a gripping, fast-paced, and energizing narrative written by beloved award-winner Jason Reynolds, this book shines a light on the many insidious forms of racist ideas–and on ways readers can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives.

Written in an entertaining and hilarious voice, Jason Reynolds shows and explains the roots of racism in the United States in ways that everyone can understand. But as he makes clear, Stamped is not a history book. And it’s not. It’s a book about racism, and racism is an issue that is happening here and now. So yes, we are able to look at the roots of racism, and learn about the history of racism in the United States. But, we are also able to take the history that we’ve learned and look at the racism happening in the United States today and we can see where it came from.

This book explains the loopholes in the constitution, that former slaveholders exploited. The book sheds light on the complexity of historical figures like Thomas Jefferson and tells the story of activists like Angela Davis. All of this is told with a clear voice and is written in a witty style, that is sure to make you laugh out loud.

Jason Reynolds: After earning a BA in English from The University of Maryland, College Park, he moved to Brooklyn, New York, where you can often find him walking the four blocks from the train to his apartment talking to himself. Well, not really talking to himself, but just repeating character names and plot lines he thought of on the train, over and over again, because he’s afraid he’ll forget it all before he gets home.

My rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Why? This is an incredibly written novel that keeps you interested, no matter your age. Adults and kids alike will be interested in learning the history, will

Recommendable: Yes

To who? Written for middle grade and young adult readers, I think that anyone looking for a simple yet clear and concise way to learn about the roots of the racism that we see today in the United States will find this book quite useful. It is also written in a really funny voice that makes the book entertaining and educational at the same time.

Have you read Stamped? Do you want to? Chat with me in the comments below!

2 thoughts on “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism and You, by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi | the first nonfiction book I’ve reviewed on my blog, and it has not let me down

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