Let’s Talk Bookish: How many POVs is too many?

Hello and happy Friday! Today I’m going to be participating in Let’s Talk Bookish, a weekly discussion post created and hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books. This week’s topic is How many POVs (point of views) is too many? (suggested by Heran @ Be Frisky)

Do you like books with multiple POVs, or do you prefer books with one narrator?

I don’t really have a preference. I love books with multiple POVs; I think it’s a really cool way to show more about the characters, and I also love books with just one narrator, or from the 3rd person perspective! I love reading books from all points of view, but I do think that books with multiple POVs are really cool.

How many POVs should one book have?

It really depends. There are some books where there I really think there should be more. For example, in Six of Crows, in my opinion, Wylan should have his own point of view! He is such a crucial character, and should really be added to the book. (He does have his own point of view in Crooked Kingdom, so that’s great).

I haven’t ever read a book were I wished there were less POVs. Thats probably because once you’ve read a book with multiple POVs, it’s hard to imagine an entire section of that book gone, or at least very different.

There are also some books where the multiple points of views are done perfectly. For example, in Every Soul a Star, by Wendy Mass, Ally, Bree and Jack rotate through the chapters, narrating their own parts. In The Candymakers, also by Wendy Mass, the way the different POVs are told is kind of different, but really cool. The first big chunk of the book is narrated by one person, then the next chunk is told be someone else, however the story doesn’t continue; it loops back to the start, so in the end you’ve gotten the same story four times told by different main characters. It seems confusing, but it actually works really well and is a really interesting way to read.

Books I love with multiple POVs:

  • The Gilded Wolves, by Roshani Chokshi
  • Six of Crows, by Leigh Bardugo
  • Refugee, by Alan Gratz
  • Every Soul a Star, by Wendy Mass
  • The Candymakers, by Wendy Mass

How many POVs is too many?

So now that I’ve talked a little about my opinion on multiple POVs in books, here’s my answer to the main question:

There is no such thing as too many POVs, at least in my opinion. Of course, if an author were to write a book with 50, or 30 or 20 POVs, that would be very overwhelming, however, I’ve never encountered a book with too many POVs.

I’ve read amazing books told from 3 POVs, 4, 5, and even a few more. Now that I think about it, I’ve read quite a few good books with multiple POVs!

Conclusion:

So, how many POVs are too many, you ask. And I answer: there is no limit. Just don’t make a 5000 page book with 500 main characters who have their own POVs. That would only give them each ten pages, and that’s barely enough to explain their name, hair color, and favorite Disney movie. So, any number of POVs in a book is good, as long as each character with their own POV has enough room in the book and has a part in the story that makes sense, and is more or less essential!

How many POVs do you think is too many? What’s your favorite Disney movie? Have you read any of the books I mentioned? Chat with me in the comments below!

Happy reading!

2 thoughts on “Let’s Talk Bookish: How many POVs is too many?

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